Tag Archives: st. john the baptist

Rev. John W. Moore, C.M. Family Papers

The Moore Family Papers include correspondence between John William Vincent Moore, seventh president of St. John’s University from 1906 to 1925, and various members of his family. Also included are several pieces of ephemera and a candlestick rumored to date from the Reformation, when it was used by priests who offered Mass surreptitiously, in secret chapels in the homes of Catholic Scots by the documentation provided. The letters from Fr. Moore detail his life as a seminary student in Germantown, Pennsylvania, his first time visiting St. John’s College in Brooklyn (a temporary assignment before he eventually became President), visiting New York City and touring several churches and other famous sites in New York for the first time, including St. Patrick’s Cathedral and “the Great Bridge of Brooklyn.” He also writes about family life, including the death of his father, whose funeral he was not able to attend, and marriage advice for his sister. Letters from July and August 1914 provide information on Rev. John W. Moore in Europe (Germany, France, and Spain) at the breakout of World War One. A letter dated February 5, 1911 from “Bud,” Fr. Moore’s nephew, to his mother, Mary Weber, provides a description of his last months at the seminary in Germantown, and the reasons why he left to be with his uncle and study at St. John’s College.

Finding Aid (PDF)

Digital Collection

 

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Exhibition: The Churches and Chapels of St. John’s University

On View November 25 – December 19, 2014
St. Augustine Hall 4th Floor

stained glass

 

 

In honor of the 10th anniversary of St. Thomas More Church on the Queens Campus, this exhibition revisits the many churches and chapels that have been a part of St. John’s. The elaborate stone Church of St. John the Baptist in 1894 on the original Brooklyn campus at Lewis Avenue (and the wood frame church that stood before it), and the Chapel of St. Vincent de Paul in 1952 at Schermerhorn Street in downtown Brooklyn, were the first two sacred spaces to serve the St. John’s community. The dream of building a freestanding church as illustrated in the original 1955 master plan of the Queens campus evolved from a temporary chapel in St. John Hall, to the Chapel of Our Lady of Lourdes, and finally in 2004 St. Thomas More Church. Also highlighted are the faculty residence chapel in St. Vincent Hall, and the Chapel of St. Vincent de Paul on the Staten Island campus, which was originally part of Notre Dame College of Staten Island.