Tag Archives: manuscripts

William Vaudrey Papers, 1829-1872

This collection documents William Vaudrey’s voyages around the world. It includes his diaries and their transcriptions by an unknown hand. The diaries are written in very small, nearly illegible script, and sometimes in faint pencil. Some are illustrated with small architectural drawings, which are also reproduced in the transcriptions. The diaries seem to have been prepared for publication, however no trace of publication was found (as of 2018). The transcriptions may have been written soon after the original diaries, indicated by the neat, formal cursive which uses the “long s” or “descending s” which was still sometimes used in handwriting the late 19th century. Vaudrey’s diaries give a description of the countries he visited, and relay the difficulties of the journey in the middle of the nineteenth century, as well as provide some anthropological approaches to the populations encountered. The collection also includes travel documents such as passports, as well as correspondence with relatives and travel companions.

Little is known about William Vaudrey Esq., except by his own papers. He was an English subject born in Lancashire. It appears that he traveled for pleasure. According to his French passport, he was 25 years old in 1838.

Finding Aid (PDF)

William Vaudrey travel diary image

Advertisements

F.H. Madison United States Naval Academy Plebe Exam Notebook 1894-1895

This notebook contains copies of exams given F. H. Madison, a plebe (Class of 1898) at the United States Naval Academy, in mathematics, algebra, geometry, French, English and history from 1894 to 1895. Together with his grades in these subjects are the names of instructors and marks for efficiency and conduct. Mounted in the notebook are numerous pictures of ships of the American, French, English and Italian navies. Some of the vessels illustrated were built by the William Cramp & Sons Ship and Engine Building Company.

Finding aid (PDF)

F.H. Madison Navy Plebe Book image

Jollon Family Papers, 1898-1955

This collection includes correspondence, newspaper clippings, photographs, and other documents related to the Jollon family, of which several members attended St. John’s University. The majority of the papers relate to Alfred J. Jollon, who graduated from St. John’s College with a Bachelor of Arts in 1905 and a Master of Arts in 1908. He served on the St. John’s College Alumni Association and the Board of Trustees, and was awarded an Honorary Honorary Doctor of Laws from St. John’s College in 1929.

In addition, there are various documents that illustrate the university’s history, including correspondence regarding a patent filed and received by Dr. Rev. Edward J. Carey, C.M. of St. John’s College for a type of athletic hurdle equipment (filed October 21, 1922, issued April 14, 1925).

Finding aid (PDF)

Jollon Family Papers image

 

Student Composition Book, 1871-1874

This composition book was handwritten by seventeen students of St. John’s College, Brooklyn, New York, (founded in 1870) between 1871 and approximately 1874. The ledger has a plain cover and lined paper with no page numbers. The title page reads, “Compositions of Class of 1871-72 Saint John’s College Cor. of Lewis + Willoughby avs Brooklyn L.I. N.Y.” in decorative handwriting. The binding is fragile and the ink on some of the pages is faded.

The entries within this volume vary in length; some are shorter and authored by only one or two students, while the longest story, “Edward Bradwell” was written by nine students contributing various chapters. Only a few entries are dated. One entry describes the funeral services of the Rev. David O’Mulane, Pastor of the Church of St. Vincent de Paul, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, on October 25, 1873.
The seventeen student authors are listed in the roster of pupils in the St. John’s College course catalogs. The list below shows the academic years in which each student is listed, as well as their home address at the time. Several of the authors of the essays in the book were founding members of the school’s first student society the “St. John’s Literary Union.” The society’s motto was Veritas Semper Vincit (truth always prevails).

Finding Aid (PDF)

Read a blog post about the Composition Book

Student Composition Book 1870's

Rev. John W. Moore, C.M. Family Papers

The Moore Family Papers include correspondence between John William Vincent Moore, seventh president of St. John’s University from 1906 to 1925, and various members of his family. Also included are several pieces of ephemera and a candlestick rumored to date from the Reformation, when it was used by priests who offered Mass surreptitiously, in secret chapels in the homes of Catholic Scots by the documentation provided. The letters from Fr. Moore detail his life as a seminary student in Germantown, Pennsylvania, his first time visiting St. John’s College in Brooklyn (a temporary assignment before he eventually became President), visiting New York City and touring several churches and other famous sites in New York for the first time, including St. Patrick’s Cathedral and “the Great Bridge of Brooklyn.” He also writes about family life, including the death of his father, whose funeral he was not able to attend, and marriage advice for his sister. Letters from July and August 1914 provide information on Rev. John W. Moore in Europe (Germany, France, and Spain) at the breakout of World War One. A letter dated February 5, 1911 from “Bud,” Fr. Moore’s nephew, to his mother, Mary Weber, provides a description of his last months at the seminary in Germantown, and the reasons why he left to be with his uncle and study at St. John’s College.

Finding Aid (PDF)

Digital Collection

 

George J. Crane Papers, 1898-1949

George James Crane graduated from Boys High School, Brooklyn, in 1910, and then earned a B.A. (cum laude) at St. John’s College in 1914, an M.A. at Columbia University in 1917, and a Ph.D. at Fordham University in 1929. He also served in the armed forces during World War I. Crane was a teacher and principal at several New York City area elementary and high schools including Boys High and Boys Summer High in Brooklyn; East Side Evening High in Manhattan, and P.S. 71. He was the first principal of Bayside High School in Queens, from 1936 until 1951 when he retired. Additionally, from 1920, Crane taught courses in English and American Literature at St. John’s University and Manhattan College. George Crane passed away in 1966.

This collection contains the personal papers of George Crane, including memorabilia, correspondence, photographs, clippings, class and lecture notes, a master’s thesis, dissertation, and publications. There are two scrapbooks; one contains personal items such as school and drama club materials, newspaper clippings, and photographs. The other scrapbook was compiled by Crane’s students in 1933 prior to his trip to England.

George J. Crane portrait

Christopher J. Gorman Collection, 1932-1940

Christopher Joseph Gorman received his B.A. from St. John’s University in 1934. As an undergraduate he was active in many student organizations, including the Skull & Circle honor society (president), Sigma Zeta Chi, Crusade Club, Student Council,  Torch (business manager), Vincentian (organization editor), Glee Club, Orchestra, and Dramatic Society, as well as class football and basketball, among other activities. Gorman went on to study at St. John’s Law School, from which he graduated in September 1936.  He acted as editor-in-chief of the Law Review journal of St. John’s Law School in 1935-1936.

This collection contains memorabilia collected by Christopher J. Gorman during his time at St. John’s University and as an alumnus, including two scrapbooks he compiled about his education, career, and personal life.

Finding Aid (PDF)

Christopher Gorman yearbook photo

Elaine M. Lilli Collection, 1952-1956

Elaine Marilyn Lilli (née Andrews) graduated from University College at St. John’s University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in June, 1956. She was a member of the Squaw Society (a sorority at University College), Chorus, The Gaels, History Seminar, Intramurals, and St. John’s News, among other activities. This collection contains memorabilia from Elaine M. Lilli’s time at St. John’s University from 1952 to 1956.  The items reflect her academic and extracurricular activities.

Finding Aid (PDF)

Elaine M. Lilli yearbook photo

Original Leaves from Famous Books – Nine Centuries 1122 A.D. – 1923 A.D.

This collection of manuscript and printed leaves from famous books was complied by Otto F. Ege, a professor of art history and private collector of manuscripts.

View the collection online.

ege_book_007

 

Harold Kleinsinger Collection, 1942-1979

Letterhead of 1944 correspondence to Professor Kleinsinger

Finding Aid (PDF)

View letters on a map

Harold Kleinsinger was born in New York City on July 20, 1907. He studied at Fordham University and received a Ph. G and Ph. C there. He received his B.S. from the City College of New York and M.S. in Analytical Chemistry from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. Kleinsinger was a professor of analytical chemistry and physics at the St. John’s University School of Pharmacy from 1931 to 1973. He established the Iota Chapter of Rho Pi Phi, and was an honorary member of the Skull and Circle honor society. He died in New York City on January 6, 2001.

This collection is comprised mainly of letters sent to Professor Kleinsinger, as well as a few pieces of memorabilia and other papers. Kleinsinger maintained correspondence with his former pharmacy students who joined the war effort, becoming pharmacists, medical technicians, chemists, soldiers and sailors during World War II. The letters include observations of daily life on the military base or aboard navy ships, requests for letters of reference, news of promotions in rank, and progress in their studies and research. On a more personal note, his students also sent announcements of marriages and births, and requested news of former classmates and professors back home at St. John’s University. Some of the students were Jewish, as was Kleinsinger: one former student, Nat Simon, writes to Kleinsinger about facing discrimination due to Jewish quotas in medical schools. There is one letter from pharmacy faculty member Hugh Luongo, who left St. John’s to serve in the war. Many of his students continued the correspondence for years after the war ended. Letters were sometimes addressed to Harold and his wife Frieda and their children. There are also a number of letters sent to Harold by his family members.

St. John’s University made important contributions to the wartime effort. In addition to the work of students in the pharmacy program, the university provided training for two hundred and fifty men for basic engineering. They were subsequently transferred to foreign battlefronts. St. John’s also offered free courses in engineering, science, and management war training with help from the U.S. Office of Education. St. John’s served as a training site for the Army Specialized Training Corps, (3230th Service Command Unit) from December 1943 to April 1944.